THE ADVOCATE COMES TO ON-DEMAND

Posted by Tamas_Harangi in Blog | 0 Comments

21

Jul

2014

Facebook On Demand Banner 071814

Today, The Advocate is making its debut on various on-demand channels in the US. I’ll be posting the links here as they become live so we can all get our Roku on together.

As of today, you can check us out on:

The Advocate iTunes The Advocate Vudu The Advocate Google Play

The Advocate XBox The Advocate YouTube amazon

And more to come.

If you have seen the movie and enjoyed it, but haven’t rated it on iTunes and other sites yet, we’d certainly appreciate it. Good user ratings and reviews help others find the film. Thanks!

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The Rise of the Anti-Guru: Screenwriting in the Age of Vine

Posted by Tamas_Harangi in Blog, screenwriting | 0 Comments

8

Mar

2014

Over the past few months I’ve been watching a shift play out in the world of aspiring screenwriters. A new set of gurus are challenging the old guard, generating a discussion about the true nature of what it takes to become an effective story teller.

Used to be that if you wanted to learn about the ins and outs of writing for Film and TV, outside of the usual academic routes, your best options lay in books and seminars of instructors like Syd Field, Michael Hague, and Robert McKee. I have a great amount of respect for these guys and very much enjoyed reading and learning from their books, but they all share one common aspect with many college professors, and that is they don’t actually work in the industry as screenwriters. Does that prevent them from being good instructors? Not if you ask me, but if you happen to pose the same question to Brian Koppelman, the scribe behind such movies as Rounders, The Knockaround Guys and Runaway Jury, his six second answer comes down to this:

(Click on upper right for sound / mute.)

This Vine clip by Koppelman was the first of his fascinating and addictive Six Second Screenwriting Lessons series, which, is now up to over a 190 clips as of this post. Drawing from his experience as a working scribe, Koppelman has used these Vine bits to come out strongly against what he calls “the Screenwriting Instruction Industrial Complex,” by which he means the instructors mentioned above.

He is not alone, fellow writers John August and Craig Mazin, hosts of the Scriptnotes podcast have taken a similar tone when asked repeatedly about what books they would recommend for beginning writers. Mazin has compared the authors of “how-to” books to “reverse engineers” who never managed to actually build a house.

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WRITING ON THE CORNER OF FOUNTAIN AND HIGHLAND

Posted by Tamas_Harangi in Blog, screenwriting | 0 Comments

28

Dec

2013

I finally finished my new screenplay that I’ve been working on for over a year. It turned out to be a unique experience, insofar as it was the first time I used four different screenwriting apps to find the right workflow to get my ideas on the page.

I could’ve stuck with Final Draft. Despite the many complaints by others, I don’t have any major issues with FD, but I seem to be on the permanent lookout for a more effective outlining solution than FD can offer. So for this project, in search of the best outlining and drafting workflow, I played around with some of the new apps available. Here’s my rundown of the various tools I used with their pros and cons. If you’re anything like me and geek out about writing tools, some of my experience might be of interest.

First, the issue at hand:

Outlining

Final Draft's index card mode

Final Draft’s index card mode

When I work on a story, I do my best to start with as good an outline as I can, and sometimes I manage to make it very detailed, but depending on the project, the outline may be quite broad before I jump into the draft itself. In almost all cases, I end up doing further outlining and inserting story elements once I’m in the draft. In this last screenplay for example, I got a bit stuck with my outlining at about the midpoint of the story, so I decided to start working on parts of the draft anyway. That, in turn, got the juices flowing and the characters connecting, and it allowed me to find the way through the rest of the story.

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